How Can I Preventing Spring Running Injuries?

Running Injuries | Houston, TXIf you’ve been planning on training for a marathon, you’re probably excited to go out every time the weather is nice. Running in wintertime is not a pleasant experience, and that warm weather can be a welcome treat after a long, cold winter. But, if you are suddenly ramping up your training for a marathon or triathlon, you could be putting yourself at high risk of developing an injury.

Causes of common springtime running injuries can involve worn out or ill-fitting shoes, pushing yourself too hard too fast, or poor running form. Even issues like running on the curve of the road can lead to injuries. Keep reading to learn how to avoid common springtime running injuries, so you can have a great summer and reach your marathon goals.

Common Running Injuries

It makes sense that common running injuries affect the knee, ankle, shin and foot. In short, the body parts that are hard at work when you run are obviously going to be more strained by running. Ultimately, you need to be aware of your body and what can go wrong. Specific injuries could be affecting your run, and the more you know, the faster you can seek treatment. If you’re sensing an issue, it could be:

  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Shin splints
  • Stress fractures
  • Tendonitis
  • Patellofemoral pain
  • Hamstring strains
  • A pulled muscle or ligament sprain
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Iliotibial band syndrome
  • Patellar Tendinopathy

Before you dive in and try to pick up where you left off last year, take a step back to avoid a serious injury that you’ll regret. Create a strategy that works up to where you want to be. You have a long spring and summer ahead of you. There’s plenty of time to build up endurance so you can enjoy a nice summer. If your goal is to run a half marathon, you need to build up to it and keep tabs on how you’re feeling.

If you have questions or feel you have an injury you need looked at, give us a call at  713.986.6016 to schedule a consultation.

Posted in: Sports Medicine

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